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PDF Internet, Society and Culture: Communicative Practices Before and After the Internet

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The result is the definition of two types of communication that are lived simultaneously in the twenty-first century.

One type of communication is from before the internet and relies on the body having touched and created a message-for example, by attaching signature-to stabilise the nature of sender, message and receiver. Internet-dependant communication is different because no identity-marker can be trusted on the internet and so individuals' styles of communicating are used to stabilise the transmission of messages. Being after the internet means having to live these two contradictory forms of communication. Help Centre.

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  • Announcement: New Book from Tim Jordan on Communication and the Internet – Culture Digitally.

Link Either by signing into your account or linking your membership details before your order is placed. Description Table of Contents Product Details Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! In Stock. Zucked Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe. Unfreedom of the Press.

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Bird By Bird. The Editor's Companion 2ed. But what I find interesting, and he notes it in passing but makes very little of it, is that both of his examples here are about illicit communication. Not surprising, coming from the author of the book Hacking.

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But I wonder what it might accomplish, to approach an analysis of communicative practices by starting with only illicit ones. Not that he continues to do this: the case studies are of letter-based correspondences in the early nineteenth century and immersive social gaming today. But perhaps he will continue to have an eye for the illicit? What might a deliberate and thorough-going focus on the illict push him to see?

Certainly, illicit communicative activities are even more fraught when it comes to questions of ascertaining who is speaking and forging trust around those practices. Thanks Tim, for sharing this with us.

Internet, Society and Culture: Communicative Practices Before and After the Internet

I actually had the pleasure of reading it a little earlier and offering a blurb for it, and so I feel compelled to share one of my main reactions to this text — also the main reason why I find this text so meaningful. I am really drawn to the premise Tim establishes for the studies: The idea that pre-internet communicative practices possessed an identity stamp connected to the body, whereas post-internet communicative practices carry an identity stamp rooted in styles of interaction. This begs the question: does presentation of the self then become inherently more stylized and performative, as physical identity markers become more elusive?

Yes and no. And so, while there are obvious differences between identity markers employed in the letter writing practices of Australia early colonizers and the contemporary performative practices of gamers colonizing virtual spaces, there are also important similarities in how people play with matter to tell stories about their own physicality.

Internet Society And Culture Communicative Practices Before And After The Internet

What limits the interaction, thus, is not necessarily the technology itself, but the metaphors we employ to understand how to use it. Thanks for sharing this glimpse into your new project, Tim. I appreciated the way that this opening chapter outlined the challenges that accompany larger-scoped research questions and carefully laid out your plans for managing them.

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One of the themes that really stood out in my reading is the notion of legitimacy. In theories of deliberation and democracy, legitimacy refers to the recognition that the outcomes of a particular communicative situation are just. This chapter left me wondering about how these various meanings of legitimacy might refer to some common underlying concept. In the preliminary discussion of letter-writing, we are reminded of wax seals and signatures, material traces of a physical act that refer to a particular body situated somewhere else on the globe.

Can we imagine shipping bits of hair or nail clippings along with packages to be read by DNA scanners on the receiving end? Recall the film Gattaca or the cyberpunk trope of holding a stolen eyeball up to a retina scanner to open a locked door…. Is it important to separate mediated communication between individual humans from messages sent between institutions or non-humans? The senders of robocalls, spam emails, stock tickers, system errors, and automated traffic tickets cannot be legitimized with physiological signals.

Tim points out an intriguing shift from meta-data outside of a messages such as a wax stamp to an authentication grounded in shared semiotics—slang, emoticons, jokes, and other lexographic habits. Thanks again, Tim. Somehow your intriguing historical perspective propelled me sidelong into science fiction. A few responses.

Physicality and the body is something that came up a lot and took me a while to think through.

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